A Contemporary Finish; Acoustic Panels in the New Russian Lounge

The Russian Lounge in the John F. Kennedy Performing Arts Center, in Washington, DC, opens next month. EverGreene artists and fabricators created more than 100 acoustic panels, with a custom plaster finish, to be installed in the newly reconstructed lounge donated by Russian philanthropist Vladimir Potanin. The Russian Lounge joins other reception rooms dedicated to other foreign entities such as Africa, China and Israel.

The artistic vision for the lounge reflects design elements and aesthetics found in contemporary Russian culture. In collaboration with Russian architect Sergey Skuratov, EverGreene’s plaster artisans, fabricated Venetian finishes to be placed onto acoustic panels. The panels absorb sound, creating a restorative environment that is ideal for hosting receptions and dinners.

The Russian Lounge is unique among EverGreene’s projects and complements our historic work. Here, we exercised our contemporary design aesthetic to serve the minimalism rendered in the architect’s plans. Our artisans, trained in traditional techniques of sculpture and well-versed in the practical requirements of plaster installation, met the design challenges to create and fabricate these 12’ x 5’ plaster panels.

To achieve this finish, additives were sprinkled into the panel mold after which the wet plaster was added. The additives react to the water within the plaster, which results in a fizzing, bubble-like pattern in the face coat, giving it a unique, textured finish. The integrally-colored panels also contain a variety of aggregate that causes a sleek metallic sheen to the plaster’s surface.  The look and texture of each panel contributes to Sergey Skuratov’s polished aesthetic for the Russian Lounge while ensuring an acoustically pleasant environment.

In the studio, artists sprinkle an additive into the plaster mold

In the studio, artists sprinkle an additive into the plaster mold 

 

The wet plaster is mixed and added to the mold containing the additive

 


The additives react to the water within the plaster, which results in a fizzing, bubble-like pattern in the panel’s face coat

 


The bubble-like pattern is smoothed and refined resulting in a finished look for the acoustic plaster